Subtly Learnt SALES STRATEGIES from Reading CRIME NOVELS

Conventionally, one would choose to read a Sales book when felt learning new techniques or decides for a refresher. Might skim through a Motivation handbook too when days tally more rejections. Since obviously you want a whopping sales volume, do you think reading the same genre of books would be the hover board against the trot? You might need something varied right?

Crime novels could be educative for the sales profession too. It may be lengthy but surely, you’ll be startled the soonest you identified the sales spells popping between lines the writer had artfully weaved into.

CHARACTERS. Caution to modulate likeability.

Personalities living in the novel are fictional from what had sprung from the writer’s mind. However, part of the traits of these characters are real and in fact, only on varied percentage existent to the people you’ll meet across the sales table.

Meeting with these people then is a beneficial preempting tool so you could modulate your presence in dealing with a similar (only different in percentage) behavior when you meet a prospect every day. You’ll be efficient then on working out how to be likeable and agreeable to your guest, propelling to qualify a well understood pitch. This helps you sharpen your intuitions in reading who a person might generally be so you can again, adjust how your attack would be. Remember from now on, you aren’t just meeting people in a crowd, in a novel too.

SYNONYMS. A revolver for your pitch’s clarity.

Have you ever driven your pitch where you seem like expressing the correct point but the prospect is still seem waiting for a perfect word that shots them to agree with the deal? By experience, synonyms have a distinct controlled impact to the prospect’s “not now” to “yes to the purchase” continuum. I usually call this particular word as the closing chant, closely like “abracadabra”.

 The more terms for a definition you know, the more specific you could clearly convey the point you want to persuade. Be vigilant in picking especially when your pitch poses an analogy and technicality since prospects have varied vocabulary tagged along with their varied personalities. Generally, choose the synonym with the good associations like “Own” rather than “Buy”. In cases of affecting a more felt sense, use the extreme version like “spotless” rather than “tidy”, “spacious” rather than “wide”, “exhausted” than “tired”, “scalding” than “hot”. Having database of synonyms is like having a revolver to increase the chance of firing the most precise word which your prospect long to hear as a trigger of their YES. A crime novel is a perfect source of these. Aside from clarity, synonyms also influence your tact and credibility.

When reading mystery novels then, plot your smartphone beside you with a dictionary app. Search for the new word you just have read and add it to Favorites. Assign a word of the day which you shall then use the next time you pitch. Still note, be deliberate what synonym to say to a specific prospect. This tip applies to the next too.

IMAGERY. A bribe for higher appraisal or price conditioning.

“The floor was sheathed in oriental rugs, the white painted rough stucco walls covered with masks and carvings, archeological by-products of her mother’s career, I imagined. Hadley filled and plugged in a small electric espresso coffee maker and got two fine china cups, setting them on a round, heavy walnut table with clawfeet next to one of the dormer windows. The view was of the back garden with its rows of new vegetables coming up and of several horsechestnut trees, cooling the house with hundreds of fresh green fans.”

Isn’t that a compelling involvement pitch when you are in a Real Estate or Timeshare Sales? A Crime novel, on its endeavor to let the readers visualize the story, has a lot of those descriptions which you can simply modify to make it specific to your offerings. These are Adjectives and Adverbs which appeal to the senses of your prospects which thereby stimulate buying instincts. These describing words are secret inks to masterfully paint the mental picture your prospect desire when they have availed your offer. Involving spiels are intended to be drooling making your offer irresistible.

The tip is, stimulate the prospect’s imagination by describing to them orgasmic feeling of every senses (in such a perfect blend). Let them feel how a thing is being done or how a thing looks like in such an articulate recitation is far more effective than the by-the-manual demonstration or by-the-catalogue presentation. Let them not just hear it but ultimately, let them feel it and anticipate the real gratification. Be their walking VR glasses. Synonyms are for clarity. Adverbs and Adjectives are for interactivity.

MOTIVES. Refuge from sale stalling objections

Criminals never confess on the 1st chapter after the crime. Thus, mysteries give birth to the detective tandem of the reader and the sleuth. The cascade of the story then flashes reel of motives that points to a list of suspects. These accused are humans who are driven with motives, making lies seem spontaneous especially to those both directly and indirectly guilty.

Prospects, human as they are lie too, but always consider their lies as pardonable. Especially when you haven’t fully sold them yet. Being exposed to countless versions of lies rooted from equally countless motives as you read mystery novels, sharpens your thermometer of how sincere the commitment you are getting as you ask the close. Collaterally, you also develop the sales skill of how to assess the kind of person your client is, so you could pattern which part of the benefit of your offering would tickle their motive of committing to a purchase. From asking what kind of questions, how to act as you probe the truth and even boxing in skills as well as how to be intimidating therapeutically. This is such a skill to treasure when honed.

Objections categorically should be accepted as your prospect telling you to tell them the right thing. However, be sensitive too since objections could also be your prospect’s litmus on your credibility and persistence as well as a tactic to stall a sale. As you meet several motives along your readings, you will be able to exercise the conviction of your guts every time you drive your pitch away from rejection. To achieve this, it takes several prospect encounter and crime novel readings too. Human behavior, just like books could be read too.

TWISTS. Cue for your pitch’s elements of surprise

Human ears are good for 7-20 minutes. Thus never be a mascot for boredom. Aside from avoiding a monotonous voice and repeating same point, sprinkling elements of surprise is such a magical tactic to not let your prospect be thrown to the boredom pit, rather be hooked into what more you could let them feel.

The turn of events in novels is just a perfect exercise on how to jockey surprises in your pitch. You are seem a writer who perfectly knows how the story would end but regulate when a certain revelation would happen. When to off a character, when to creep and cut a moment. Reserve the most stimulating benefit for the specific client to that part which you feel would fully engage their buying reflex, just like the scene which curtain calls all the mysteries in the crime novel. The juncture that connects all the circumstances. Let them be hooked. Let your pitch be gripping.

A master closer never settles rather, is dynamic in learning and experimenting sales strategies. Seeking out other than the usual learning materials, Crime Novels as one, is tantamount of upgrading your closing caliber. Always remember to be different and keep on looking things that differ you amongst those who are also striving. Be different. Laconically, a Closer is the sleuth of the mystery. Prospects are the suspects while the confession of the crime is the purchase.

 

One thought on “Subtly Learnt SALES STRATEGIES from Reading CRIME NOVELS

  1. Pingback: How to Arouse Emotions for a Surefire “IT’S-A-YES!” Proposal – johndappercloser

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s