3 Reversible Mistakes which make your Sales Pitch Less Involving

It isn’t a pitch when it isn’t compelling. Despite of the efforts we exert to achieve this, unfortunate days exist when we sit back to our chair after a hardly jockeyed sales presentation asking “Is my pitch not involving enough?” The answer is yes. Chances are, it may be because of these reversible mistakes.

When prospects are hyped, Closers FORGET to shift to a take-away pitch.

Blame it to your sizzle that prospects seem levitating with your offer’s benefits. But too much fantasized gratification wards off the deal. Be in control. Sense it when prospects are “excessively sold”. Stop and proclaim that your offer is not for everyone to own. This isn’t a perfect system unless the owner knows how to make this work properly (not perfectly) to them. Equalize the prospect’s “too ideal” mental picture by siting drawbacks when your offer is used improperly. Drive them back to reality, then ask for the close. It is when they have settled from the hype and still they love owning the offer, that ultimately tests how sold they really are.

When the buying commitment turns flat, Closers NEGLECT to detour to a negative pitch.

This is why episodic check of the buying pulse should be done during your pitch. Intermittent trial closes (of asking when this is affordable would they like to own it?) helps you gauge how willful the prospects are to pay. This helps you calibrate whether their yes is a half meant no or an absolute no.

Reverse the next trial close. Ask “When this is affordable why won’t you own it?” Stop talking. They have to talk first. Wait. Count till 5 seconds. When they react, listen intently. Deal with their true concern then rephrase the reversed trial close.

Reverse the fact-benefit sizzles. Sizzle should sound like you are letting them feel the fear of missing out. Squeeze in the phrase “should have”. Present a feature which prospects won’t enjoy the benefit anymore since the ownership is not for them. Never ever be a pushy presenter. You know your offer’s worth. You know your work’s pride. You know your skill’s calibre. Yes you are an egotistical closer!

Return the course of the pitch to the pro active tone after ample throws of ironic involving spiels. Observe the difference. Modulate then your approach.

When the prospects have heard enough, Closers FAIL to articulate silence.

Mental pause augments understanding. Don’t be a rata-tata-tat. Be a bang! Stop believing that the more features you say, the more sold the prospects would be. This is why you have to do well on the warm up. To identify which among the features they’ll associate their purchase. Always make it a culture to count to five every after blowing a weighted feature and every after asking for a close. Before initiating the handshake. The silence helps them substantiate their appraisal which boosts their confidence on doing the purchase. It crushes the fear of buying instantly. If you have lay out the benefits well and sprinkle your sales techniques suavely in the pitch, you will not be afraid to let them breathe and think on that 5 seconds. Use these seconds too to prepare what will you say when the prospects expresses another “no but tell me more” remark. Aside from mental pauses, you can also make use of therapeutic space at some instances. Deliberately leave them for a while at certain parts of the showroom or play like you’ll be going to the toilet shortly.

It isn’t a pitch when it isn’t compelling.

Anything goes during a sales pitch and that should be an advantage for you as a Closer. It is your job to facilitate the way your prospect perceives the encounter. Closers equalize emotions, balance logic and regulate expectations. These modulations make the presentation involving. Not that you have to be flawless, but just never let mistakes sabotage your journey to a lucrative close. Especially when mistakes, though are dab and unavoidable, but are detectable and downright reversible.

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